Rudy Gobert and Salt Lake City

<p type = "text" content = "It is March 9th in the Vivint Smart Home Arena and a group of girls, parents, an employee, a volunteer and two board members from Girls fleeing Utah Watch a nail bit between that Utah jazz and Toronto Raptors. On International Women's Day, for every shot he blocks, Rudy Gobert will donate $ 1,000. "data-reactid =" 32 "> It is March 9th in the Vivint Smart Home Arena and a group of girls, parents, an employee, a volunteer and two board members from Girls fleeing Utah Watch a nail biter between Utah Jazz and the Toronto Raptors. On International Women's Day, for every shot he blocks, Rudy Gobert will donate $ 1,000.

<p type = "text" content = "After the game, the girls tour the arena. They venture into the courtyard and take in the magnetic aura of an empty arena. Gobert emerges high in a white hoodie and black sweat Tunnel Open – Fucking, feeling sorry for, and taking selfies before pretending to be a human-sized check.Gobert's foundation, Rudy’s Kids, turned to Girls on the Run for help Urban Indian center of Salt Lake and asked if Native American children were interested in participating. "data-reactid =" 33 "> After the game, the girls visit the arena. They venture into the courtyard and take in the magnetic aura of an empty arena. Gobert emerges from the tunnel with a white hoodie and black sweat, fucks the girls up, pities them, and takes selfies before pretending to be a human-sized check.Gobert's foundation, Rudy & # 39; s Kids, reached out for Girls on the Run, who reached out to the Urban Indian center of Salt Lake and asked if Native American children would be interested in participating.

The daughters of Samantha Eldridge, a mother of two Native Americans, were among the group that was present. "For many of these girls, they will never have the opportunity to go to a jazz game at all. It was huge," said 40-year-old Eldridge. "It was even more exciting to get to the bottom of the field and a player I know they felt special. "

The next afternoon, Eldridge tweeted a picture of the girls and Gobert with the title: “Many thanks to @ rudygobert27 @RudysFoundation for inviting UICSL (Urban Indian Center from Salt Lake), Girls on the Run, to the game last night! We appreciate that Rudy takes the time to meet the girls and for his generous donation to inspire the girls to further realize their limitless potential. #NativeYouth #GoJazz. ”

Two days later, the notifications piled up.

<p type = "text" content = "In the Chesapeake Energy Arena in Oklahoma City, the corona virus collided with professional sports. Gobert tested positive for COVID-19. The game was canceled. Shortly afterwards, the NBA season was interrupted. Jazz teammates and employees were trapped in the visitors' locker room at the behest of the Oklahoma Department of Health. It was in the public interest to use 58 out of 100 daily tests on the jazz tour group. Neither jazz, Rudy Gobert nor his foundation responded to requests for comments. Subsequently, Gobert promised to donate $ 500,000 to part-time employees of the Vivint Smart Home Arena and relief measures against coronaviruses in Utah, Oklahoma City and his home country France. "data-reactid =" 37 "> In the Chesapeake Energy Arena in Oklahoma City, the corona virus collided with professional sports. Gobert tested positive for COVID-19. The game was canceled. Shortly afterwards, the NBA season was interrupted. Jazz teammates and employees were trapped in the visitors' locker room at the behest of the Oklahoma Department of Health. It was in the public interest to use 58 out of 100 daily tests on the jazz tour group. Neither jazz, Rudy Gobert nor his foundation responded to requests for comments. Subsequently, Gobert promised to donate $ 500,000 to part-time employees of the Vivint Smart Home Arena and to aid measures for coronaviruses in Utah, Oklahoma City and his home country France.

<p type = "text" content = "While workers in hazardous substances work in disinfected seats in the Chesapeake Energy Arena, Eldridge was waiting on the phone with that Hotline of the University of Utah Healthcare. Her 10-year-old met Gobert and feels good. But her 12-year-old daughter is tired, her head hurts, her neck hurts. "Data-reactid =" 58 "> While workers in hazardous goods suits carry disinfected seats in the Chesapeake Energy Arena, Eldridge was waiting on the phone with that Hotline of the University of Utah Healthcare. Her 10-year-old met Gobert and feels good. But her 12-year-old daughter is tired, her head hurts, her neck hurts.

Eldridge finds a comment below a picture of the girls with Gobert that says, "They are already dead." Another poster suggests that the girls could "spread the corona virus". Your girls wonder if that's true.

Eldridge deletes her post and advises the other girls who participated in the game to delete hers. "Knowing that some of the girls read this stuff online," she said, "is just really scary for them."

The next day, her daughters' school district closes in Murray, south of Salt Lake City. They wonder if it's up to them.

Worse, could they infect their 68-year-old grandmother? "Like many native communities, we live in extended households," said Eldridge. “Many of us take care of our elders in our community. There is no place we can send them to. We are their main maintainers. So it's huge to know if someone is healthy or not. "

Eldridge doesn't get the answers she needs. Despite complying with both CDC guidelines – being exposed to a known carrier and showing symptoms – her daughter is denied a coronavirus test.

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<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "In the next weeks Celebrities come under fire for using a limited set of test kits that would better serve healthcare workers and frontline patients. An epidemiologist who prefers to remain anonymous told Yahoo Sports that it may be a public good that professional athletes are tested. They travel, meet strangers, perform, sweat and mix in crowded stadiums. An athlete who tested positive for the coronavirus sends a hint of association anxiety to thousands of people at the same time. But as Steven Taylor, author of The Psychology of Pandemics, writes, "A moderate level of fear or fear can motivate people to deal with health threats, but serious threats can be debilitating." "Data-reactid =" 69 "> In the next few weeks Celebrities come under fire for using a limited set of test kits that would better serve healthcare workers and frontline patients. An epidemiologist who prefers to remain anonymous told Yahoo Sports that it may be a public good that professional athletes are tested. They travel, meet strangers, perform, sweat and mix in crowded stadiums. An athlete who tested positive for the coronavirus sends a hint of association anxiety to thousands of people at the same time. But as Steven Taylor, author of The Psychology of Pandemics, writes, "A moderate level of fear or fear can motivate people to deal with health threats, but serious threats can be debilitating."

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "The corona virus itself does not differentiate between rich and poor New York Times estimates that the corona virus could be twice as deadly for low-income communities. The wealthy are better equipped to work from home, socially isolate and slow their spread. In marginalized communities, these changes are logistically complex and economically difficult, with complicated solutions and fewer resources. "Data-reactid =" 70 "> The corona virus itself makes no distinction between rich and poor, but its ripple effects The York Times estimates that the corona virus could be twice as deadly for low-income communities. The wealthy are better equipped to work from home, socially isolate and slow their spread. In marginalized communities, these changes are logistically complex and economically difficult, with complicated solutions and fewer resources.

<p class = "Canvas-Atom Canvas-Text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "In Salt Lake County, during the coronavirus crisis, in the middle school closings and job losses and after an earthquake of March 18 that was 5.7 on the Richter scale – the largest in the state for 28 years – these communities turn to each other for support. "We always did," said Chelsie Acosta, a local activist and health teacher at Glendale Middle School. "We take care of each other. During the greatest times of crisis, our community rises and cares for one another and the most marginalized members of our group. “" Data-reactid = "71"> In Salt Lake County, during the coronavirus crisis, amid school closings and job losses, and after an March 18 earthquake that was 5.7 on the Richter scale – the largest in the state for 28 years – these communities turn to each other for support. "We always did," said Chelsie Acosta, a local activist and health teacher at Glendale Middle School. "We take care of each other. During the greatest times of crisis our community rises and cares for each other and the most marginalized in our group. "

"We know," she continued, "we cannot rely on the health system. We know that if you don't know, are rich and privileged, this kind of introduction is done. "

Chelsie Acosta delivers goods to Elizabeth Montoya, based in Salt Lake City. (Courtesy of Chelsie Acosta)

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On March 12, four miles from the Vivint Smart Home Arena, students at Glendale Middle School found that their classmates were part of the group that Gobert met on behalf of UICSL and Girls on the Run.

The combined seventh and eighth grade had spent the past week learning about the coronavirus and seeing Sanjay Gupta on CNN, briefings from the Ministry of Health, and videos of hospitals built overnight in China. "I wanted to show my children: the helpers, the resilience," said Acosta, who also taught English as a second language and directed a Latinos in Action program that was discontinued last year.

So you are not surprised by the news. However, knowledge does not play down the moment when terms such as "unmasked" – once the subject of distant news – are printed on sheets and distributed on desks.

Glendale is a title 1 school that receives additional federal funding to meet the educational needs of a high concentration of low-income students. The majority of the neighborhood is Latin American and over a quarter of the population lives below the poverty line.

Acosta is closely associated with her students. "I think a health teacher is a very vulnerable, loving kind of safe space," she says. In a class, Acosta draws a three-part diagram on the whiteboard and divides the class into groups.

First, they create a list of questions. Second, they write their fears: "In our communities, more children live with elders, that was a big problem," said Acosta. Older people are particularly susceptible to the corona virus. As of 2016, one in five households – 84 percent are not white – in America are cross-generational.

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "Acosta's mother, who was also a teacher, lost a seven-month struggle against cancer in January. Since then, her 70-year-old father has lived with her. They use the same kitchen. They eat together from afar. They grieve together. She believes that they will survive this crisis by staying socially close while being physically distant. When she gets home, she wipes first and puts her clothes in the laundry. She disinfects her hands excessively. She washes towels and pillowcases every day. She wonders: "Am I thinking? I think? "" Data-reactid = "100"> Acosta's mother, who was also a teacher, lost a seven-month fight against cancer in January. Since then, her 70-year-old father has lived with her in the same kitchen. They eat together from afar. They grieve Together, she believes that they will survive this crisis by staying socially close while being physically distant. When she gets home, she wipes first and puts her clothes in the laundry. She disinfects her hands excessively. She washes towels and pillowcases every day. She wonders: "Am I thinking? I think below? "

In the last section of the exercise, students develop a plan: to speak to their families, to find resources in different languages, to prepare meals. "Do you have a plan if you get a fever? "What is that?" Asked Acosta. "They felt safe (after the discussion) because we are all in the same boat."

But the next day at lunchtime, the students panicked into the office and asked to be seen by the nurse. That evening, the governor of Utah announced the closure of all schools, from kindergarten to grade 12.

——————

Murray City Councilor Rosalba Dominguez returns from a conference in Washington DC and hears from a colleague from the school board. He asks Dominguez if she checked in with her friend Samantha Eldridge.

Eldridge thinks about reaching herself, but hesitates. She knows Dominguez was busy and that she was in DC.

Dominguez calls on March 12, a day after Eldridge's first attempt to have her daughter tested was denied.

"I thought Sam, whatever it is, don't hesitate to call me," said Dominguez. "She didn't want to blame me."

Together, Eldridge and Dominguez exhaust different avenues – the University of Utah Health Clinic, Salt Lake County Health Department – while Dominguez shares Eldridge's situation with some colleagues. A friend involved in coronavirus decision-making gives her a tip: try doctor's offices – they have more test kits.

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "On March 13, after $ 59 for the In the ConnectCare app, Eldridge has been waiting over two hours on the phone to be examined by her daughter's pediatrician, and her daughter's condition has worsened since Wednesday in Rhode Island, another Child who has received an autograph from Gobert tests positive. "The nurse I spoke to was really empathetic," she adds. The FDA has relaxed its restrictions. Test kits are becoming more and more available. "Data-reactid =" 109 "> On March 13, after paying $ 59 to use a ConnectCare app, Eldridge waits for over two hours on the phone to be checked by her daughter's pediatrician. The daughter's condition has worsened since Wednesday, another one in Rhode Island Child who has received an autograph from Gobert tests positive. "The nurse I spoke to was really empathetic," she adds. The FDA has relaxed its restrictions. Test kits creep into greater availability.

Maybe that's why her daughter will be admitted for a test the next morning.

"It just depends …" Eldridge fell silent. "But that's the thing. I still don't know what's important. "

Nevertheless, she is relieved. The results are negative. She is worried about the girls who have not been tested, including her other daughter.

"They are the ones who have to go back to the community and face their peers, face the bullying on social media, even if only people wonder whether they had it or not," said Eldridge. “And I have a feeling that it would at least give them something that could say: 'I was tested. We were negative. "

Murray City Councilor Rosalba Dominguez in her home. (Courtesy of Rosalba Dominguez)

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In the meantime, Dominguez is waiting.

Quarantined at home on March 18 after the earthquake, she spends the day talking to her 12-year-old stepdaughter.

Dominguez says her generation seems fatalistic. The children in school are convinced that the world will go down somehow. She wonders if it is because they are very aware of climate change. In any case, an earthquake on a pandemic reinforces the children's case.

"When we got into these roles, we didn't think about it:" I will be able to help people in a pandemic, "said Dominguez, who was elected to Murray City Council last fall." But we are here and trying to do that to promote people's true feelings. "

The conversations she has with her family are the same that she has with her voters and avoid her fears of making room for others. "

Dominguez tries not to think about death and approaches it with a Zen-like acceptance – your time to go is your time to go – and tries to summon the ancestral strength of her mother and grandmother, both healers. In reality, she thinks a lot about it. Everyone does it.

Dominguez has asthma. She had pneumonia several times. She is not feeling well. Chest pain. She tells her partner that she doesn't want to be connected to a ventilator when it matters. "I don't want a tube in my throat to survive this thing because I already know my lungs won't survive."

<p class = "Canvas-Atom Canvas-Text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "She took the same plane back as city councilor from Washington Ben Adams , Who tested positive for COVID-19. It has also been tested. She takes her steps back. Did you shake hands at the conference you attended? She doesn't remember. But they sat side by side. "I was just so paranoid at the conference and never felt that way," she said. So she knew she had to call Eldridge. If she was scared, she cannot imagine what it is like for Eldridge to worry about her mother and her daughters. "Data-reactid =" 142 "> She took the same plane back from Washington as City Councilor Ben Adams. Who tested positive for COVID-19. It has also been tested. She takes her steps back. Did you shake hands at the conference you attended? She doesn't remember. But they sat side by side. "I was just so paranoid at the conference and never felt that way," she said. So she knew she had to call Eldridge. If she was scared, she cannot imagine what it is like for Eldridge to worry about her mother and her daughters.

On March 20, another council member tested positive. Dominguez calls the clinic. Still no results. While quarantining, Acosta is handing over food to the Dominguez family.

The next day Dominguez's test is negative. Two days later, she places a box of wine in front of Acosta's front door.

Acosta has created a Comunidad Facebook group to help the community overcome the coronavirus crisis. It connects community leaders from Black Lives Matter, Latino groups and the LGBTQ Pride Center.

Murray councilor Rosalba Dominguez works from home. (Courtesy of Rosalba Dominguez / Instagram)

On the morning of the earthquake, people check in online. A commentator says she's fine, but it feels like a bad movie. Another advises people to prepare for power outages by filling containers and bathtubs with water and charging their devices. "Random people invited other people and it's really cool to watch the connections and conversations," said Acosta. Mutual aid groups like Comunidad have mobilized organically across the country.

Later that day, they distribute free medical care kits to five of the six hubs they have set up around the valley when fever is inevitable. Acosta looks after a physically handicapped group who is stuck in an apartment complex on the fourth floor.

On March 23, Acosta decides to rest and isolate to get her 70-year-old father to safety. In the Comunidad Facebook group, she writes: “I want to avoid the shops and spaces in which I could be exposed or exposed. I'm still here, we're still doing it. Simply switch and tighten the needs and runs. "

The next morning she writes to a friend who organizes meals for a refugee community. She has rice and beans for her. But her friend has to work until evening. In the afternoon, Acosta is back in her car.

She hopes that we will all emerge from the rubble with bigger hearts. "I have a feeling that a large number of us will become much better people and will remember what it means to be a person who helps another person."

Acosta's students made her a Snapchat account. Sometimes they bombard them with stories. She draws back messages and tells them everything will be fine. Then she hangs up. "I think," Oh God, I hope we'll be fine. "

<p class = "Artboard-Atom Artboard-Text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "More from Yahoo Sports:"data-reactid =" 172 ">More from Yahoo Sports:



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